When you go to a Navy uniform, you’re a Navy man

When you go to a Navy uniform, you’re a Navy man

I was in the Navy, but I never really felt like I belonged.

After serving a tour in Iraq in 2003, I moved to Florida.

As I was working on my master’s degree, I began to feel the pressure to succeed and get ahead in life.

I started reading the Naval Institute’s graduate-level class in leadership development.

I thought that, like my peers, I would excel in my field and, at the same time, be a great example to my peers.

So I went through the mandatory leadership course.

I went to the Navy Recruit Training Center (RTC), where I was assigned to the first-class office and had a chance to work with my fellow officers and train my future peers.

As a rookie, I learned about how to lead in every area of my life, from building relationships with other officers to communicating with subordinates.

After graduation, I had the chance to become a full-time lieutenant and then, in 2009, I was promoted to captain.

When I joined the Navy in 2010, I became the youngest enlisted sailor in the history of the service, surpassing a fellow captain’s record of 57 years.

After three years of rigorous training, my command wanted me to be the first African-American captain in history.

After months of meetings with other top leaders, I signed a letter of intent.

I received my captain’s jacket and was assigned as the first black female officer on the USS Gerald R. Ford.

But I wasn’t there to be a hero.

I was there to serve.

My experience in the RTC helped me realize that I am not a warrior, but a mentor.

The first black woman in command The Naval Institute commissioned a study to determine whether there was an increased risk of sexual assault when African-Americans were promoted to captains, in part because of a lack of diversity within leadership.

It was a difficult task, as we are still trying to understand how to ensure that people of color are promoted to senior leadership positions and the military’s highest leadership ranks.

The study found that black women experienced more discrimination and less confidence in their ability to make important decisions in their roles as captains, the captain of the ship, and vice president.

When the researchers compared those data to data from the military in general, they found that the African- American experience was more prevalent in senior positions than the general population.

This study was not about racism, but about the different experiences that we had when I went into the Navy.

I had no idea that being a captain was so important to my career, and that I was being evaluated on my ability to lead, rather than on how well I would perform in other areas.

After being promoted to commander in 2012, I joined my first command team in Hawaii.

The captain I was leading was also the first female commander.

I found it so inspiring to be on the same ship as one of the most respected and respected leaders in the world, and to have a chance at being on the front lines as part of a team.

I knew I was not the only woman of color in my command team.

In my first year, I served as the chief petty officer in charge of our air wing, which includes airmen.

I learned that we would often deploy with smaller units of three or four.

Each time we deployed, the squadron would be the last one to arrive.

When we went out to patrol, the airmen would have to stand in line and wait for the next squad to arrive, even though they were not scheduled to be there.

I saw how it affected the mission, and it made me realize how important it was to me to serve my country.

I wanted to serve our country as well.

I felt a sense of obligation to my people, and I wanted them to know I was doing what was right for them.

As the captain, I realized that there were some people in my chain of command that were afraid of me because of my color.

I experienced the same issues in my own chain of commands.

I came to realize that people were afraid to work for me because I was black.

That was a scary feeling.

I understood that it wasn’t my fault that my commanding officers did not trust me, that I had to lead from the front.

I became more confident in my ability and willingness to lead and my ability as a leader.

When my captain became the first Asian-American to command in the Pacific, she told me that I would be an excellent commander.

It’s important to understand that there are people of different colors in leadership positions.

We all have a different set of skills, which makes it easier for someone of color to lead.

Being a leader means being an empathetic person.

I am an empathic person.

My commander and I had a great relationship, and she believed in me.

She believed that I could serve my nation as well as she did.

In fact, she was so supportive of my decision to go into command.

As she said, “You are

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